Changing of the Guards mystery and a bird’s ‘Eye’ view

Short one today: 

We continue to enjoy the efficiency of the London tube. After a lazy wake up this morning, we headed in with the masses to see the changing of the guard at Buckingham Palace. We snatched up the last patch of gate to press our faces against. From then on, everyone else piled in behind us front-rowers. 

   

Police came by warning us about thieving, so we secured our backpacks.

The changing of the guards was an interesting spectacle but a little bewildering; at times a laboursome process with several minutes at a time of complete the stand-still silence.   

  

 I would recommend people who are going to come see it, research the significance behind all the pomp and ceremony of it. I didn’t research it at all and consequently spent way to much time envisaging how I could make the whole thing more time efficient.   

 Afterwards, we caught a train to Waterloo Station, probably London’s busiest station (and the one with the most escalators) It is huge! From there we walked to where we could the London Eye just near the South Bank promenade.   

 
We booked tickets for the next available London Duck Tour. This is a unique tour because you are transported in one of their fleet of yellow ducks, amphibious vehicles used in WW2. 

 The tour was brilliant. We saw the stunning architecture in many of the the buildings I have been looking at online for 18 months as well as many other sites.

   

   

     

  Our guide was full of facts and crazy trivia about the sights we were going past and the people involved with them. 

  Towards the end of our 70 minutes, our Duck splashed into the Thames with us on board and we cruised past Big Ben and London Eye before heading back to base. 

 I highly recommend the Duck Tours, guys!
We jumped in the queue for London Eye with our prepaid tickets.  Maybe it is overpriced, but for a visitor it is unbeatable for the views and novelty factor.  

Every time I looked up at the London Eye from a distance, it looked stationary. But the wheel with its 38 pods (representing the 38 boroughs of London) rotates fully once every half hour. The London Eye rakes in 32,000 English pounds an hour! No wonder it stayed put! The views from the pod started out awesome and just got better and better! 

   We finished our day’s itinerary back at Waterloo Station in a Lush store for Kara we headed home.

Another long but great day!

Oh can you guys remind me; I need to call the pigeon rescue tomorrow? I need to have them help out a poor pigeon with its foot tangled in rope.

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